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▶ The Melon Heads

The Melon Heads are legendary beings that live in and around parts of Michigan, Ohio, and Connecticut.  They’re described as small humanoid figures with bulbous heads that come out at night to attack people. There are a couple of different origins as to where they came from which we will explore today.

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The Headless Nun

I attend a Catholic school, and we have a chapel right next to the school. Back then (around the early 1900’s) all of the teachers were mainly nuns, priests, etc. Supposedly, a priest got a nun pregnant and ashamed of her “sin”, she committed suicide by jumping off of the bell tower (Which is attached to the chapel). When they found her body, her head wasn’t attached. (There’s a patch of healthy, green grass and where she died, that spot, all of the grass is dead.)

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▶ 10

The White Van

A girl was studying late at night and she was listening to the radio. The station was taking calls from people, and they would tell ghost stories. Then the DJ would rate them (haha). When the segment is over, the DJ would replay all the ghost stories in case some listeners have missed it. So one caller called and started to tell his story.

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▶ 10

One of the ghost stories that I was told when I went to a boarding school is about this girl who went to common room in the middle of the night to study.

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Hell Yeah Horror Manga: The Baby Doll

hellyeahhorrormanga:

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A toy company began selling “realistic” baby dolls to expectant mothers. But apparently, after the mother had her child, the baby toy would start crying. Eventually, the “rocking motion” advertised to calm it down wouldn’t work, and you couldn’t get it to stop without shaking it. Eventually…

▶ La Llorona

fuckyeahnightmares:

La Llorona (“The Weeping Woman”) is a widespread legend in Mexico, the American Southwest, Puerto Rico and Central America. Although several variations exist, the basic story tells of a beautiful woman by the name of Maria killing her children by drowning them, in order to be with the man that she loved. When the man rejects her, she kills herself. Challenged at the gates of heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name “La Llorona”. 

Read below to read her story. 

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Bloody Mary

Yep. I’ve had previous experiences with this “Bloody Mary” thing. I used to go to an elementary school (Juarez Lincoln Elementary School) that was in a phase in which all the students would go into bathrooms saying “Candyman,” “Bloody Mary,” & all these  ”summoning ghosts/demons” things in the bathrooms all because of these “Stories To Tell In The Dark” books came out in the library.

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Loudon Road

There’s a old country road on the outskirts of my small town called Loudon Road. The road has always been known to be the local “dare” among high school student looking for a scare. I recently went out on the road with a friend and her family.

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▶ Ningen

Over the years, rumors have circulated in Japan about the existence of gigantic humanoid life-forms inhabiting the icy waters of the Antarctic.

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▶ Bloody Mary

fuckyeahnightmares:

The Bloody Mary legend and its several variants date from the 1960s. Like so many folk rituals and traditional tales, its exact origin is impossible to pin down with any specificity. Folklorists didn’t begin collecting examples of the text until 1970 or so.

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▶ Question

What is your favourite urban legend?

▶ The 13th Floor

Have you ever wondered why there is no 13th floor in most buildings? The urban legend comes from a old haunted house somewhere in Pennsylvania. People were invited to the house on Halloween and they were asked to sign waivers to protect the owner from anything that might happen to them. The guests would then try to get to the 13th floor through a bunch of long hallways and staircases. Each floor would try to scare the guests more and more from reaching the next floor up. Those who left in fear of reaching the 13th floor were lucky, because anyone who had ever reached the 13th floor has never come out of the house to tell their story.


▶ La Llorona

La Llorona (“The Weeping Woman”) is a widespread legend in Mexico, the American Southwest, Puerto Rico and Central America. Although several variations exist, the basic story tells of a beautiful woman by the name of Maria killing her children by drowning them, in order to be with the man that she loved. When the man rejects her, she kills herself. Challenged at the gates of heaven as to the whereabouts of her children, she is not permitted to enter the afterlife until she has found them. Maria is forced to wander the Earth for all eternity, searching in vain for her drowned offspring, with her constant weeping giving her the name “La Llorona”. 

Read below to read her story. 

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▶ The Mexican Corpse Bride

‘La Pascualita’, who first appeared in the window of a bridal boutique in Chihuahua, Mexico, in March of 1930, has become the subject of some spooky urban legends. These are all attributed to the striking realism of the figure, and the rumor that she isn’t just a mannequin: she’s supposedly the embalmed daughter of the former shopkeeper. Ever since she was first placed in the display window, many people have felt disturbed over the details on the figure, like her fingernails and facial features, and some noticed a similarity to the shop owner, Pascuala Esparza. She became known as ‘La Pascualita’, and despite published statements from the store owner’s family denying her origin, the name stuck. People have said that the figure will change positions at night, and many are creeped out by her gaze, which is said to be piercing and almost ‘alive’. Some of the current employees of the store refuse to change the clothes on the dummy, and many say that their hands break out into a sweat whenever they get near her. ”Her hands are very realistic and she even has varicose veins on her legs. I believe she’s a real person,” one employee was quoted as saying. Whether she is real or not, the display window that La Pascualita resides behind has become a popular place for Dia de Los Muertes altars and she has become a bit of a famous oddity with recent attentions devoted by Mexican celebrities. 

▶ Bad Mother

The story of the bad mother which I am about to relate is not well-known, but it is still real. If you have a heart of steel, iron nerves and the soul of a sumo wrestler, sit down, make yourself comfortable and read this story. But if they are weak-minded or fear cruelty and blood, then you must not listen to my tale.

In a small town in Spain, many years ago, there was a woman named Rosa who lived in a hut. She raised four children with her husband, two sons and two daughters. Her eldest son was named Francisco. Javier was next, followed by Maria and the youngest, Lucia.

Those who knew Rosa said that she was a nice woman, but after the death of her husband, she slowly began to go insane. Little by little, she began to treat her children worse and worse. The young boys and girls were terrified of her, because whenever they did even the slightest thing wrong, Rosa would fly into a rage and hit them so hard that their cries could be heard echoing throughout the house. The neighbors were aware that Rosa was a bad mother, but they had no way of knowing just how bad she could become.

One night, the weather forecast on the radio predicted heavy hail, heavy snow and widespread thunderstorms. It was very cold and Rosa told her children to take the axes out of the woodshed because they were going into the forest to chop some firewood.

The children knew that their mother would get angry if they didn’t listen to her. Within minutes, they were waiting outside, armed with flashlights, bags and axes. They also brought some rotten meat with them in case they encountered a wild animal.

Once they had reached the middle of the forest, Rose took her son Francisco aside.

“Francis, you come with me”, she said. “The rest of you cockroaches, look around for wood.”

Without another word, Francisco grabbed his bag and followed his mother. When they were out of sight of the other children, the mother turned to him and said, “Francisco, hold out your bag and stand perfectly still.”

He held out the bag and his mother walked behind him.

“I hope you understand what I am about to do”, she said. “Your father was the only one working, and without his income, we are lost. In our house, there is one too many mouths to feed and I am starving. Sorry, but at the same time, no regrets…”

With that, his mother picked up the axe and swung it at her son’s head. It sliced cleanly through his neck and his severed head fell into the bag he was holding. Then Francisco’s body collapsed in a heap on the snow, still clutching the bag.

The mother used some snow to wash the blood off her axe and then ran back to her other children.

“Francis was eaten by a bear”, she said. “It’s not safe out her. We better go home.”

The poor children had no idea what their mother had done. They cried all the way home, mourning the loss of their older brother. They were unaware of what fate had in store for them.

At home, when the children were bathing and grooming themselves upstairs, Rosa called Javier and told him she needed help in the kitchen. Javier, always an obedient child, ran downstairs as fast as he could.

“Make me some tea, you little cockroach!” ordered Rosa.

When the tea was ready, she growled, “Bring me the bottle that is sitting on the top shelf of the cupboard.”

The boy did as he was told. Rosa poured the contents of the bottle into the tea and then handed it to Javier and told him to drink it.

Young Javier was not suspicious in the least. He took the cup his mother handed him and swallowed it in one gulp. He had no way of knowing that his evil mother had poisoned it with deadly cyanide.

A minute later, Javier crawled upstairs and collapsed in front of his siblings. He was foaming at the mouth and rolling around on the ground.

Lucia came running downstairs and cried, “Mommy! Mommy! Javi is having a cardiac arrest!”

Rosa calmly walked up the stairs and found Javier lying motionless on the floor of the bedroom. His crying sisters were standing over him. The mother gave his corpse a kick and told the girls that their brother was dead.

That night, Maria and Lucia cried themselves to sleep. Early the next morning, Rosa went into Maria’s bedroom and woke her sleeping daughter.

“No need to get up this morning”, she whispered. “You don’t have to do your chores today. Do you hear me, my pretty little cockroach?”

Maria nodded as Rosa sat down on the corner of her bed and began to sing her a lullaby. It was a song she used to sing when Maria was just a baby. The young girl welcomed this tenderness from her mother and soon closed her eyes.

Suddenly, Rosa took an icepick out of her sleeve and before Maria knew what was happening, she drove it into her daughter’s chest, piercing her heart. Maria died almost instantly.

A few hours later, Lucia woke up and went into her sister’s bedroom. She was horrified to find the bed soaked in blood and Maria lying dead in the middle. Terrified, Lucia ran downstairs.

“Mommy! Mommy!” she screamed. “A murderer broke into the house while we were sleeping and killed Mary!”

“I must confess one thing”, said her mother, calmly. “My daughters and my sons, I have both loved and hated. I was the one who killed your brothers and your sister. I did it all. I chopped off Francisco’s head. I poisoned Javier with cyanide. I pierced Mary’s heart with an icepick and now, I will strangle you slowly, so that you suffer more than your siblings. I hate you, you cockroach!”

“No, mother!”, cried Lucia. “Don’t do it!”

But her crazed mother didn’t listen and soon Lucia too lay dead on the floor.

Nobody knows what happened to Rosa. Perhaps she wandered out into the forest and died, or maybe she left town and changed her name. No trace was ever found of her. It is said that, today, the house in which they lived still stands and it is haunted by the ghosts of the children who were killed there. Local people say that if you go out into the forest and say “Francisco” five times, the ghost of a headless boy will appear behind you and chop off your head with an axe.